Human Rights in Prison

IPRT promotes a penal system that is: humane as experienced by people who are detained, protects and promotes human rights and equality, and strives to achieve international best practice in formal regimes, daily practices and overall culture.

It is the sentence of deprivation of liberty in itself that is the core punitive sanction, the conditions and treatment while in prison should not be used as additional punishment.

Accordingly, we believe that while restrictions on the freedom of movement are necessarily introduced while in prison, prisoners should retain all other rights to the greatest possible degree while serving their sentences. In particular, IPRT believes that prisoners have the right to be treated with dignity and respect for their rights; they have the right to safety and security of the person, the right to be treated humanely and be free from torture, degrading or inhuman treatment or punishment.

We work to ensure that regimes in prisons and children detention facilities are humane, and reflect human rights standards as a minimum in the short term, striving for international best practice in the medium to long term.

Invitation to Tender: Making Rights Real for those with Disabilities in Detention 30th November 2018

IPRT is seeking applications from suitably qualified applicants for the research and production of a report on the rights of people with/experiencing disabilities in detention in Ireland. Read more

Round Up: Progressing inside? Ireland’s prison system in 2018 26th October 2018

IPRT hosted 'Progressing inside? Ireland’s prison system in 2018' on 26 October 2018 in the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission. Central to the seminar was the launch of the second annual 'Progress in the Penal System' report. Read more

Progress in the Penal System: A framework for penal reform (2018) 26th October 2018

The second a series of three annual reports providing a comprehensive report on human rights and best practice in Ireland’s penal system. Read more

Second annual report on standards in Ireland’s penal system finds little progress in key areas – IPRT 26th October 2018

ADVISORY: IPRT has published the second annual 'PIPS' report, showing limited progress within the last 12 months in meeting human rights in Irish prisons. Read more

Census of Cell Occupancy and In-cell Sanitation July 2018 10th August 2018

The Irish Prison Service Statistics Office has recently published its quarterly statistical analysis cell occupancy and in-cell sanitation for July 2018. Read more

Immigration Detention: Nasc Report Reveals Flaws in Ireland's Immigration System 13th March 2018

Nasc has launched a new report on Tuesday 13th March 2018, ahead of plans for a new immigration detention centre in Dublin Airport. Read more

The Irish Examiner: UN body told of failings in the oversight of Irish prisons 21st July 2017

An article by Cormac O’Keeffe in The Irish Examiner on how the United Nations Committee against Torture (UNCAT) has been told of failings in oversight, in the investigation of complaints, of ill treatment and of concerns about prison healthcare in Irish prisons. Read more

Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC) Publish Report Ahead of 2nd Periodic UNCAT Review 18th July 2017

IPRT welcomes the publication of IHREC’s report in advance of the 2nd periodic review of UNCAT Ireland and the Convention against Torture. The IHREC report highlights the need for the State to ratify OPCAT which would provide a clear ‘roadmap’ and timeline for the implementation of OPCAT. Ireland signed the… Read more

Minister introduces Amendment to Prison Rules: “Meaningful Human Contact” 7th July 2017

On 29th June 2017, Minister for Justice and Equality, Charles Flanagan TD, introduced an amendment to Rule 27 (1) of the Prison Rules 2007 to 2017. Read more

IPRT Project: Progress in the Penal System (PIPS) 18th May 2017

IPRT has secured funding for a 3-year annual flagship project, with the overall objective of providing a comprehensive report on human rights issues in Irish prisons. Read more

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